OPEN CLASSROOM WEEK March 23rd - March 27th, 2020

UPDATE: Due to current events, the OPEN CLASSROOM week in-person observations will be postponed to a later date.

We are still offering online observations and Zoom observations, where you can see how instructors use Zoom to teach in real time. Thank you for signing up and supporting teaching and learning at the University of Arizona. 

Participants will also have the opportunity to attend an online wrap-up session on Monday, March 30th from 3:00-4:00pm.

Click on the links below to find out more information and to register for one, or more, observations. 

Please contact the Open Classroom Week organizer, Sarah Grace, with any questions. 

Instructor: Paul Blowers & Adrianna Brush

 

Elements of Chemical and Environmental Engineering II (ChEE 202)

This course will introduce you to the fundamental principles of chemical process analysis. It will equip you with problem solving techniques and will give you experience in the application of these techniques to a wide variety of process-related problems. This course will also begin demonstrating how mathematics and spreadsheets can be a fundamental tool for solving complex engineering problems, including the solving of transient material and energy balances.

Where: Zoom (registered participants will receive a Zoom link prior to class.

Date: Monday, March 23rd

Time: noon- 1:00 pm

 To register, click here. 

 

 


Instructor: Paul Blowers

Chemical Engineering Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow (ChEE 203)

Introduction to fluid mechanics and heat transfer applied to chemical engineering.

Where: Zoom (registered participants will receive a Zoom link prior to class.

 

Date: Tuesday, March 24th

Time: 11:00-12:15 pm

 To register, click here. 

 



Instructor: Paul Blowers & Songtao Xie

Chemical and Physical Equilibrium (ChEE 326)

Applications of thermodynamics to equilibrium processes; chemical and physical equilibrium in multicomponent systems.

Where: Zoom link will be sent to registered participants

Date: Wednesday, March 25th

Time: 11:00-11:50 am

 To register, click here. 

 

 


Instructor:Brandy Perkl

Industrial-Organizational Psychology (PSYV 375)

Application of the principles of psychology to industrial and social organizations, including personnel, human factors, organizational and consumer psychology.

Where: Zoom link will be sent to registered participants.

Date: Wednesday, March 25, 6:00-7:00pm.

 To register, click here. 

Instructor: Odile Wolf

Object-Oriented Programming and Design (CSCV 335)

Fundamentals of object-oriented software development. Includes design principles, inheritance, polymorphism, Unified Modeling Language (UML), testing, event-driven programming with graphical user interfaces, applications of design patterns, and use of existing frameworks. Weekly laboratory.

Where: Zoom link will be sent to registered participants.

Date: Thursday, March 26, 4:20-5:20pm.

 To register, click here. 


Instructor: Ashley Jordan

Psychological Measurement and Statistics (PSY 230)

In this class, students will learn to calculate and interpret statistical information relevant to psychological research. Additionally, students will be expected to think critically about research findings and to apply information learned to write article reviews. Specifically, students will be expected to critically evaluate the merits of statistical results presented in assigned research reading.

Where: Online D2L link will be sent to registered participants.

Date: Monday March 23- Friday March 27, 2020

 To register, click here. 

 


Instructor: Samantha Orchard

Introductory Biotechnology (PLS 170C2)

Biological Sciences - Is it possible to make 10,000 or even 100,000 clones of the perfect soldier (a Navy Seal) and use these clones to fight our wars (Clone Wars)? While this is illegal in a large number of countries, the answer is yes. Would this be ethical? With more information, you can make an informed decision. What if the millions of deaths that occur every year due to malaria could be prevented by introducing transgenic mosquitoes that would breed with the wild populations to disrupt the life cycle of the causative agent? Would this be ethical? Several human organs can now be artificially produced in the laboratory and transplanted to individuals where a replacement is required. It will very soon be possible to transplant ¿designer¿ organs from pigs to humans. Is either of these technologies preferable to you when you are in need of an organ? Today in professional sports, players are often tested for performance enhancing drugs. In the future, will there be a test for performance enhancing transplanted or artificial organs/limbs?

Where: Online D2L link will be sent to registered participants.

Date: Monday March 23- Friday March 27, 2020

 To register, click here. 

 


Instructor: Ron Marx

Learning in Informal Settings (EdP 314)

Learning is increasingly recognized as distributed across many kinds of environments with classroom learning occupying a small percentage of time across the lifespan. There is a need to theorize what makes non-school learning environments powerful and to understand how we can catalyze cross-setting learning. These questions have gained urgency with evidence accumulating about the benefits of extracurricular learning coupled with disparities in access to opportunities linked to family affluence. In addition, rapidly changing technologies are providing novel opportunities for personalized learning and there is an important opportunity for innovation in the design of hybrid forms of curriculum-based learning that span virtual and co-located settings.

This course focuses on these issues by considering how learning arrangements are differentially organized in schools and non-school settings, with a focus on non-school settings. Readings will include reports of place-based studies that work to identify social practices and processes of learning (e.g., peer, family, mentor interactions within museums, after school clubs, community art centers, and Internet cafes). We will also consider person-based studies of interest that capture learning across time and setting. We will draw on socio-cultural theories as a conceptual framework for understanding learning within and across settings but we will also read and discuss work carried out by sociologists, psychologists, anthropologists, and educators.

In addition to becoming familiar with some of the scholarship in this area, you will learn by getting out of the classroom and experiencing a learning environment of your choice (broadly defined - it could be an online community, any after-school space, athletic field or gym, museum, classroom, theater, nature center, or other "pre-approved" location). Student assessment includes a series of guided weekly reflections that culminate in a comprehensive report and presentation. As a part of this final report, you will propose recommendations on ways to make your chosen environment more generative and productive for learning based on what you have learned in class. Students will also lead a class meeting as a part of a small team.

 

Where: Online D2L link will be sent to registered participants.

Date: Monday March 23- Friday March 27, 2020

 To register, click here. 

 


Instructor: Elizabeth Pope

Psychological Measurement in Education (EDP 358)

Psychometric methods as applied to assessment including the ethical implications of testing, test design, traditional and performance-based tests, diagnostics, automation in testing, standardized testing, and grading processes.

Where: Online D2L link will be sent to registered participants.

Date: Monday March 23- Friday March 27, 2020

 To register, click here. 

 


Instructor: Tierra Stimson

Personality (PSYV 352 - 101)

Basic concepts and issues in personality theory and research; approaches to personality description and assessment.

Where: Online D2L link will be sent to registered participants.

Date: Monday March 23- Friday March 27, 2020

 To register, click here.